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Richard Brookhiser — James Madison — Gentleman Revolutionary — Founders Son

More NR-moving consequences that might result in a fuller bookshelf for you. We have smatterings of some of Rick Brookhiser’s acclaimed books. We can’t take them with us, but we can sell them to you! Given the varying quantities, we’ve packaged them together in the following two offers: Offer 1: ...

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Tuesday links | National Review

“Every election is a sort of advance auction sale of stolen goods.” It’s the birthday of H.L. Mencken, noted curmudgeon, satirist, and political and cultural critic. “Jay Walking” and the Fight for the Streets. The Paradox of the Elephant Brain – with three times as many neurons, why doesn’t the elephant brain outperform ...

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Irma, the Southeast’s Unwanted Houseguest

Irma, the Southeast’s Unwanted Houseguest The good news is Hurricane Irma is weakening. The bad news is that it has inflicted a heck of a lot of damage on Florida, and it’s not done yet. Hurricane Irma was downgraded to a Category 1 storm Monday after it barreled into Florida ...

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The Judge Was Right To Let Dallas Cowboy Ezekiel Elliott Play

When is the NFL like a college campus? When it’s creating and running its own embarrassing and absurd system of kangaroo courts. Unless you hate America (or were dodging a hurricane), you were watching football this weekend. And if you were watching football, you were listening to commentary about Dallas Cowboy ...

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A Memory of East Germany: The Soldiers Faced Eastward, to Keep People In

Reading Kevin Williamson’s piece today, I had a memory. Writing about the East German Communists, Kevin says, “They told the subjects of their totalitarian rule that the Wall was built to protect socialism from the evils without, but of course it was designed to stem migration out of East Germany.” ...

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Barbara Olson, R.I.P., 9/11 | National Review

Even as we were not far from the Twin Towers and the smoke — the smell of barbecue, to be completely honest – would soon reach our offices at National Review in New York, the devastation of 9/11 began to penetrate with some overwhelming sadness when we learned that our friend ...

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Macron Risks His Popularity to Liberalize France; Russian Journalists Risk Their Necks to Report the Truth

Impromptus today is a typical mélange, beginning with Burma, traveling through Iran, Russia, and Britain, and ending in New York. One of the stops along the way is France, where the new president, Emmanuel Macron, is trying to do something semi-revolutionary. A report in the London Times was headed, “Macron ...

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What is the Worst Piece of Music Ever Written by a Great Composer?

Over at The New Criterion today, I have a post headed “Coming to grips with a concerto.” It discusses Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor, and also a symphony: Shostakovich’s No. 7 in C, the “Leningrad.” At the bottom of this post, I propose a contest of sorts. ...

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A Podcast with Kevin D. Williamson, Hosted by Jay Nordlinger, September 11, 2017

There was once a famous book called “The Jacksonian Persuasion.” Well, there is a Williamsonian persuasion too: a set of inclinations, a certain experience, a cast of mind. I have recorded a Q&A with Kevin, here. We talk about recent and horrific events in Houston (where Kevin lived for some ...

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National Review Institute — Office Assistant

National Review Institute is seeking an Office Assistant for our shared office with National Review. Much of National Review’s success over the years is attributable to the staff behind the scenes. For every face you know at National Review, there’s one you don’t. Our office assistant is critical to the ...

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